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The Healing Power of Compassion: Emerging Data from the Scientific Study of Cognitively Based Compassion Training

 

The Lecture:

On December 14, 2011, Tibet House in collaboration with India International Center, organized a lecture by Prof. Lobsang Tenzin Negi, a senior Lecturer at Emory University’s Department of Religion. Prof. Lobsang is also the Founder and Director of Drepung Loseling Monastery, Inc, in Atlanta, Georgia, US. He also serves as the Director of the Emory-Tibet Partnership, a multi-dimensional initiative founded in 1998 to bring together the foremost contributions of the Western scholastic tradition and the Tibetan Buddhist sciences of mind and healing. The lecture began with Dr. Ashum Gupta, professor of Psychology at Delhi University, introducing Prof. Lobsang, greeting him with a Tibetan traditional scarf. The lecture was based on growing data from various scientific studies that shows increasing support for the view held by the Indo-Tibetan Buddhist tradition for centuries: compassion is crucial not only for our health and well-being, but also for the survival of our species. An accompanying slide show updated the audience on the comtemplative research done at Emory University examining the effects of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training (CBCT). A host of biological, psychological and behavioral outcomes have yielded compelling results. His presentation highlighted some of these key findings and explored the principal steps to cultivating compassion for greater health and well-being.

The Speaker:

Lobsang Tenzin NegiPh.D., is the Founder and the Director of Drepung Loseling Monastery, Inc, in Atlanta, GA, US and a Senior Lecturer in Emory University’s Department of Religion. He also serves as Director of the Emory-Tibet Partnership, a multi-dimensional initiative founded in 1998 to bring together the foremost contributions of the Western scholastic tradition and the Tibetan Buddhist sciences of mind and healing.  In this capacity, he serves as Co-Director of both the Emory-Tibet Science Initiative and the Emory Collaborative for Contemplative Studies. He is currently working with Emory scientists as co-principal investigator on a major clinical research project funded by the NIH that is studying the effects of compassion meditation on the experience of depression.

An Abstract:

Growing data from various scientific studies has begun to lend increasing support to the view held by the Indo-Tibetan Buddhist tradition for centuries, which recognized the crucial role of compassion not only for our health and well-being, but also for the survival of our species.    Contemplative researchers at Emory University have done several research studies examining the effects of Cognitively-Based Compassion Training (CBCT) on a host of biological, psychological and behavioral outcomes, which have yielded compelling results. This presentation will highlight some of these key findings and explore the principal steps to cultivating compassion for greater health and well-being.

 

Topic: The Healing Power of Compassion: Emerging Data from the Scientific Study of Cognitively Based Compassion Training

Speaker: Prof. Lobsang Tenzin Negi

Venue: Conference Room 1, IIC

Date: December 14, 2011

Time: 06:30 pm